Mystery and Humor

If you stop by here often, you know that mysteries and humor are two of my favorite reads, all the better if combined. Here are three more I’ve enjoyed.

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A Novel Way to Die is the second in Tamra Baumann’s bookshop mystery series, following Plotting For Murder and continuing the misadventures of Sawyer Davis, an accomplished chef who has found herself back in the small northern California town where she grew up, running the mystery bookshop she inherited from her mother, trying to understand the fifteen-year-old girl her mother had adopted, fighting her uncle over the very strange terms of the family trust, and making sense of her feelings for the local sheriff, the man who jilted her years ago.

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As if that weren’t enough, Sawyer keeps stumbling into homicides. This time the husband of an author signing her books at Sawyer’s shop turns up dead in the freezer of Sawyer’s best friend Renee’s ice cream shop. The victim and Renee once had a bad break up, too, and all the evidence points to her as the killer. But Sawyer knows that’s impossible. Now all she has to do is prove it.

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That requires the computer expertise of Brittany, Sawyer’s adopted sister and ward, inside information from Madge, the gossip loving manager of the sheriff’s office, and support from the members of the shop’s book club. Even Max, Sawyer’s third-rate magician dad, pops in with a few good ideas.

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A Novel Way to Die is a thoroughly entertaining tale, solving the mystery but leaving that strange family trust begging for another installment.

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Stayin’ Alive is the latest installment in Julie Mulhern’s Country Club Murders, set in Kansas City in the mid 1970s. The setting here is part of the fun, taking the reader back to the days when people did not carry cell phones or while away their time on computers. Ellison Russell is an artist, the mother of a teenage daughter, and a widow, and her talent for stumbling over bodies matches that of Jessica Fletcher. This horrifies her mother, who regards Ellison’s involvement in murder investigations—and her friendship with homicide detective Anarchy Jones—as a threat to her social standing.

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In Stayin’ Alive, Ellison chairs a fund raising gala for a local museum’s touring display of Chinese funerary art—and finds a body during the festivities, albeit in a closed section of the museum. And that’s not the last body. Meanwhile Ellison’s relatives and friends contribute both information and aggravation, and Max, Ellison’s incorrigible dog, falls in love. It seems like nothing surprises Ellison any more—until she finds out that even Anarchy Jones has been keeping a secret from her.

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This is number 10 in the series. I recommend reading the Country Club Murders from the beginning, because it’s so much fun getting to know the characters and following the threads running through Ellison’s adventures. Number 11 is due out in late June.

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Twisted Twenty-Six is, not surprisingly, Janet Evanovich’s 26th Stephanie Plum novel. I’ve been reading them since the first one came out in 1994. I recently replace my shabby paperback copy of that first one (One for the Money) with a newer trade paperback edition, and I have all the rest in hardback on my keeper shelf. Clearly, I’m a fan.

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When I opened Twisted Twenty-Six, the first line rang a bell: “Some men enter a woman’s life and screw it up forever.” One for the Money opened with almost exactly these words, referring to Stephanie’s relationship with Joe Morelli (I, by the way, am Team Morelli: Ranger has his charms, but Morelli is the keeper). In Twisted Twenty-Six the line refers to Jimmy Rosolli, and his forty-five minute marriage to Stephanie’s Grandma Mazur.

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The aftermath of that brief union leaves Grandma Mazur at the center of a complicated web of intrigue involving missing keys, the Jersey mob (or at least a small, elderly, but definitely dangerous branch called the Laz-Y-Boys), Rosolli’s ex-wives, and random enemies. While Stephanie and Lula, Morelli, and Ranger try to figure out who is gunning for Grandma, life goes on at the bail bond agency, and Stephanie and Lula search for the usual motley assortment of oddballs who Fail To Appear for their hearings.

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Twisted Twenty-Six continues with Evanovich’s trademark combination of humor and mystery. It’s the characters that keep me coming back year after year, and Grandma Mazur has always been a favorite. She’s front and center in this one, and I enjoyed it thoroughly.

Mysteries With Humor

Mystery and humor make up just about my favorite combination in reading for pleasure (which, come to think about is, is just about all of my reading). Here are the latest installments in three series I really enjoy (and usually preorder).

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Killalot is the sixth entry in Cindy Brown’s wonderful Ivy Meadows mystery series. Ivy is a hard-working but underemployed actress in Phoenix, where she also works for her Uncle Bob as an apprentice private investigator. This time around she’s investigating a death at the local Renaissance Faire (jousting accident or murder?) and auditioning for the role of Marilyn Monroe in a potential Kennedy era version of Camelot, called Kennelot by its playwright, John Robert Turner, formerly of the very successful Broadway team of Turner and Toe (think about that one).

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The RenFaire setting is great fun, as Ivy goes undercover as a belly-dancing mime (or is that a mute belly dancer?), meets a very smart but somewhat addled wizard, and learns about the jousting circuit. Meanwhile, the three-person cast of the potential Broadway play (staying with which would bring Ivy another set of problems involving her loyal boyfriend Matt and her special needs brother Cody) is also full of surprises. There’s something odd about Jackie, and just how is JFK connected to the falcon handler at the RenFaire? And how did the missing jousting horse end up in the playwright’s pool in the middle of the Arizona desert?

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I love this series, which scatters some serious issues among the delightfully wacky settings and stream of hilarious song, movie and play titles. Cindy Brown is one of several cozy authors I follow who write for Henery Press (others include Julie Mulhern and Susan Boyer).

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The Long Paw of the Law (don’t you love those titles?) is Diane Kelly’s seventh novel featuring Fort Worth Police Officer Megan Luz and her K-9 partner, Brigit. This time the action begins when a man drops a newborn baby off at the fire station where Megan’s boyfriend Seth and Brigit’s boyfriend Blast work. This is perfectly legal under Texas’ Baby Moses law, but when Megan unfolds the beautifully hand-made quilt the baby is wrapped in, she finds an embroidered plea for help. There just may be something going on outside the law after all, and Megan intends to find out.

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But Megan’s not a detective—not yet, anyway— and she has the usual patrol cases to follow, including a pair of thieves who specialize in stealing garage door remotes from parked cars. Along the way she meets a cosmetics and clothing consultant and an elderly dressmaker, both of whom would love to give Megan a makeover, goes to a car show with Seth and his cranky grandpa, and helps her mom study for an American History exam. Meanwhile with the help of Detective Audrey Jackson (her mentor), Frankie (her roller derby star/fire fighter housemate) and explosives expert Seth, Megan and Brigit pursue the case of the abandoned baby.

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As always, Kelly alternates police work with humor, and tells the story from three viewpoints: Megan, Brigit (who is mostly interested in food and chasing perps), and the villain. Paw Enforcement continues to be a most entertaining and enjoyable series.

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Stephanie Plum returns in Janet Evanovich’s Look Alive Twenty-Five, tracking FTAs and generally getting into trouble, with Lula at her side. This time around she’s dealing with a deli that can’t seem to hang on to a manager—they keep disappearing out by the dumpster, leaving one shoe behind. Stephanie and Lula find themselves working at the deli (Lula’s approach to sandwich production is especially memorable), hunting for a local rock musician (whose charges include peeing on a dog), and driving a burrito truck. Stephanie’s family are minor players in this installment, but Morelli and Ranger are front and center. There are feral chickens. And a catnapping. A number of seemingly unrelated cases manage to come together by the end of the book.

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Look Alive Twenty-Five made me laugh out loud several times. That’s exactly what I expect from Stephanie, and exactly why I continue to follow her adventures.

More Series Mystery

In Enforcing the Paw, Fort Worth PD Officer Megan Luz and her canine partner Brigit run into a puzzling situation: two ex-lovers who each claim the other is harassing them. Enforcing the PawVandalism, stalking, Internet hook-up sites: one darn thing just leads to another. Megan’s problem is that she just doesn’t know who to believe. Each of her complainants seems sincere and suspicious by turns, and neither Megan nor her mentor, Detective Bustamente, can decide who’s telling the truth. (Brigit knows what’s going on before the humans do.)

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Meanwhile, Megan and Brigit follow the exploits of a small time thief dressed in surgical scrubs and mask, who only steals grape Tootsie Pops, and hang out with Seth, Megan’s firefighter boyfriend, and his bomb-sniffing dog Blast, Brigit’s Best Furry Friend.

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This series is so much fun, and so funny. The characters are wonderful. I love the short chapters from Brigit’s point of view, in which liver treats outweigh most anything else. Megan and Brigit are definitely among my favorite crime fighters.

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Another very entertaining series is Julie Mulhern’s Country Club Murders, set in Kansas Cold As IceCity in 1974—before computers and cell phones changed our lives. The latest installment, Cold As Ice, finds artist, mom, and unwilling sleuth Ellison Russell embroiled in a case that may seriously affect her daughter Grace’s inheritance. It’s almost Thanksgiving, the weather is terrible, and the guest list for dinner is worse. Grace is dating a boy her mother warned her about. And there’s a corpse in the Country Club freezer.

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I have enjoyed this series immensely (as well as several others from Henery Press), and this one does not disappoint.

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Stephanie Plum, the world’s most disorganized bond enforcement agent, and her circle of friends and relatives are back in Janet Evanovich’s Hardcore Twenty-Four. Stephanie and Hardcore Twenty-FourLula are investigating what appears to be a zombie infestation in Trenton, while Grandma Mazur is corresponding with a man in Florida who looks suspiciously like George Hamilton. Joe Morelli is investigating headless corpses, Diesel is looking for someone, and Stephanie is baby-sitting a fifty-pound boa constrictor named Ethel. And, oh, yes, she finds inventive new ways to total a couple more cars. If you enjoy Evanovich’s zany characters and humor, you’ll like this installment in the Saga of Stephanie Plum.

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AE Jones’ Paranormal Wedding Planners series continues with To Have and to Howl, the story of Julia Cole and Jack Dawson. Julia is human, a lawyer, and a widow who lost her elf husband to a band of supernatural supremacists who object to mixed marriages. Her To Have and To Howlcrusade for justice appears to be complete when the supremacist leader is convicted by the supernatural Tribunal, but when the criminal breaks out of his magically reinforced handcuffs, she knows there’s more danger to come, and it may come from inside the supernatural justice system.

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Jack is a werewolf with a secret that’s interfering with his current assignment as Julia’s bodyguard, something he can’t bring himself to talk about with anyone, not even his twin brother Connor. If his secret gets out, more than Julia’s safety will be at stake.

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This is book three in the series (after In Sickness and In Elf and From This Fae Forward), and it runs a bit more to suspense and mystery and a bit less to humor than the earlier installments. In fact, there’s no wedding in To Have and To Howl, and the wedding planners take a back seat to the team of paranormal security men, as Jones’ paranormal world continues to expand.

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Paranormal Wedding Planners is a most enjoyable series from a talented author, probably best read in order. There’s more to come: I’ll be watching for For Better or For Wolf.

 

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