Recent Reading

I managed to finish reading a couple of books last weekend, not that I’m in any danger of catching up with the To Be Read shelves, and I can’t even remember what’s on my Kindle.  But I do my best.  This afternoon at work I had a job to do that involved recoding information on an online bookkeeping site (the client and her business are located several states away).  The software is slow to begin with.  My work computer is several years old and still runs Windows XP and IE8.  After each transaction, the screen refreshed so slowly that to keep from banging my head on the desk I pulled out my Kindle and found I could read a page or so while the screen was blank.  I’m not kidding.  I spent an hour and a half making those corrections as fast as the computer could handle them–and reading while I waited for each one to process.  Heck of a way to read, but better than staring at that blank screen in frustration.

I recently finished reading James Scott Bell’s Conflict & Suspense on my Kindle–excellent book.  I really enjoy Bell’s writing on writing–one of these days I’ll have to try one of his novels.  Here’s the review I wrote for the Houston Bay Area RWA newsletter.  (I also posted a review of Bell’s Plot & Structure here.)

A couple of weeks ago I read Darynda Jones’ First Grave on the Right, a book that won a Golden Heart® in 2009.  Three years later it’s on the shelves with two sequels, and another due out this fall.  I’ve only read the first one (but there are two more on my TBR stack), and I enjoyed it thoroughly.  It’s a humorous blend of mystery and romance, with a heroine who is a “part-time private investigator and full-time grim reaper.”  Charlie sees dead people, which isn’t always as much of an advantage in her p.i. work as you might imagine.  As for the hero, if that’s what he is, well, Charlie spends the span of the book trying to figure out what he is. 

Next I read Joan Hess’ latest Claire Malloy mystery, Deader Homes and Gardens.  I’ve been reading this series (and Hess’ Maggody mysteries, too) since it began, and wouldn’t miss one.  Deader Homes moved a little more slowly than most–or possibly I was just reading more slowly.  The large cast was occasionally confusing, but Claire’s daughter Caron and her BFF Inez (approaching their senior year in high school) got themselves into as much trouble as usual while helping Claire in her unofficial sleuthing.  And Claire, as usual, gets to the bottom of things in her own unconventional way.  She continues to be one of my favorite cozy detectives.

Looking for a change of pace, I opened Zoe Archer’s Collision Course on my Kindle.  This is a very short novel, published by Carina Press, and falls into the subgenre of science fiction romance.   It tilts more toward the (quite explicit) romance end of the scale, and I would have liked to see more of the universe Archer created.  But trap an independent scavenger heroine and a military pilot hero alone together in her small space ship–well, once or twice I wanted to tell them to get out of that bunk and get on with the mission.  By the time the story ended, though, I was ready to download the sequel.  If you like steamy action romance, Collision Course is for you.

I’m still reading the new biography of Queen Elizabeth II.  No hurry–that’s my coffee table book.  On my Kindle I’m enjoying Edgar Rice Burrough’s delightfully old-fashioned The Land That Time Forgot

When I finished Deader Homes and Gardens a few days ago, I had my usual what-shall-I-read-next quandary, until I opened the newspaper the next morning to see multiple stories about the movie version of Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games.  I read the book last year, but I hadn’t revisited the harsh world of Panem.  So I picked up the second book, Catching Fire.  So far, just as harsh and compelling as the first book.   Definitely not an old-fashioned tale.

Books, Books, and More Books

The other day when I sent a short piece off to a chapter newsletter, I added this as a bio clip:

Kay Hudson continues to amass books of all descriptions on her book shelves and her Kindle, and continues to wonder when she’ll have time to read them all.  Meanwhile she blogs about buying, reading and writing books at kayhudson.com.

I do blog about other things, cats and cameras and that kitchen sink someone left on my driveway last year (wish I’d had a camera that day), but I keep coming back to books.  And I keep buying more of them.

I have a stack of them here on the table, new ones I haven’t found a spot for on the To Be Read shelves yet.  Two weekends ago I stopped at Half-Price Books.  Something had reminded me of Hugh Lofting’s Doctor Doolittle books, which I loved as a child, and I popped into the children’s section to look.  No Lofting back there, but on my return to the front of the store I managed to buy four books:  A novel by Jennifer Weiner (Good in Bed), two of the Pern books written jointly by Anne McCaffrey and Todd McCaffrey (Dragon’s Fire and Dragon Harper), and a 1984 paperback printing of Anne McCaffrey’s early novel Restoree, which wasn’t there the last time I looked.  How could anyone who writes romance and grew up on science fiction resist a cover blurb like this: In another body on another world, Sara risked her life for a man of power and for an alien dream!

I stayed out of bookstores for the next week or two, but that didn’t stop me from placing an order with the Science Fiction Book Club: Third Grave Dead Ahead, the latest from 2009 Romance Writers of America® Golden Heart® winner Darynda Jones (I recently finished First Grave on the Right, Darynda’s GH winner, and I have Second Grave on the Left on the Read Soon stack; Fourth Grave is due in the fall); Naomi Novik’s Crucible of Gold, the latest in her Temeraire series, a reading experience that deserves a report of its own; and, because they were offering a third book for $2, Dragonheart, by Todd McCaffrey.

Meanwhile, on my Kindle, I added Ghosty Men, the story of the Collyer Brothers, New York City’s most famous hoarders, by Franz Lidz.  That one was one of Amazon’s daily specials, which I succumb to every couple of weeks.  I also bought Finding Her Son, by Robin Perini, seven time Golden Heart finalist and 2011 GH winner.  And then one day after the fourth or fifth time I’d seen the trailer for the film John Carter (which, sadly, isn’t getting very good reviews, and shouldn’t they have shoehorned “of Mars” into the title?), I got to thinking about all the Edgar Rice Burroughs adventures I enjoyed long ago.   All of them are now long in the public domain, and available in multiple (and therefore confusing) Kindle editions.  I never did download the Barsoom stories (one of these days), but I could not resist my favorite of Burroughs’ tales, The Land That Time Forgot, all three of the short novels in one edition.  This is a truly insane story of evolution in action from one end of a lost island to the other, with, if I recall correctly, a German WWI era U-boat thrown in for good measure (and extra villains).  I’m looking forward to revisiting that one.

This past Saturday, after the West Houston RWA meeting, a group of us went to lunch and to a booksigning at Barnes & Noble, where I bought Austentatious, a new book by fellow Houston Bay Area RWA member Alyssa Goodnight.  While I was there I also snagged Death, Taxes, and a Skinny No-Whip Latte, by Diane Kelly, who also was a Golden Heart winner in 2009.  This is her second book; the third will be out later this year.

I’m going to put all these books on the shelf and try to behave for a while, really I am.  No book buying this weekend.  I’ll be back soon with a “recently read” report–if I can stay awake.

A true book junkie, I came home from RWA

with eleven free books stuffed in my suitcase, and several interesting titles on a mental list.  (Packing tip: paperbacks fit quite nicely in the spaces between, and on either side of, the handle channels of a wheeled suitcase.)  There were half a dozen books in the tote bags we were handed at registration, more on the chairs at various events.  I left a few behind, and I carefully avoided the free booksignings put on by many of the attending publishers.  But I saw a  lot of women scurrying around with cartons and shipping their books home with the Fedex people who had set up shop on the sixth floor.

You might think all those freebies would slow my book shopping for a while, although if you’ve stopped by to read my blog you probably know better.  Sure enough, I’ve bought a few paper books and added some to my Kindle in the few days I’ve been home.

Paper books:  The day after I got home, on my way to the grocery store, I found myself at Half-Price Books, looking for a few titles I had run across at the conference.  I didn’t find any of the novels, but when I checked the shelves where they stash the books on writing, I found a copy of Blake Snyder’s Save the Cat!, a book on screen writing that quite a few novelists swear by.  Then a few days later, responding to the featured selections at the Rhapsody Book Club, I found myself ordering three more books:  Janet Evanovich’s latest Stephanie Plum adventure, and two books by Darynda Jones, First Grave on the Right, which won the 2009 Golden Heart for paranormal romance, and a good many other contests, before it was published, and Second Grave on the Left, due out next month.

Kindle:  The 2009 Golden Heart for historical romance went to Jeannie Lin  for Butterfly Swords, set in Tang  Dynasty China.  I knew of the manuscript from its considerable contest success, and admired the author’s tenacity in writing about a setting so far from the romance norm.  At the conference I read a short preview of Jeannie’s next book, and was very impressed.  So I downloaded Butterfly Swords and a companion short story, The Taming of Mei Lin, to my Kindle, and I’m sure I’ll be watching for her next release in the fall.

World War II is another out-of-the-standard-box period for genre romance, but my friend Cheryl Bolen, best known for her Regency period novels, has written one, It Had To Be You.  Cheryl has just re-issued it, the only one of her novels I didn’t have.  Now it’s on my Kindle, ready to read.

Also new on my Kindle, Got High Concept? by one of my favorite workshop presenters, Lori Wilde.  Lori gave a workshop on this topic at the conference last week, and when she mentioned that an expanded version was available as an e-book, it immediately went on my list.  If you have a chance to attend any of Lori’s writing workshops, jump on it.  She’s terrific.

My name is Kay, and I’m a hopeless bookaholic.

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