Book Shopping, Again

To no one’s surprise, I’ve bought a few more books than I’ve managed to read in the last few weeks.  A couple of weeks ago I headed over to the Local Barnes & Noble to pick up a book I’d seen mentioned on a site I enjoy, io9.com.  I was Three Princesresearching an article on alternate history at the time, and Ramona Wheeler’s Three Princes, a tale of 19th century intrigue in a world ruled by the Egyptian Empire sounded like just the sort of book I love.  As long as I was there, with a gift card in my wallet, I also bought Gossamer Wing, a steampunk romance by Delphine Dryden, which I’d seen on another blog I follow (Paranormal Unbound).

Yesterday I stopped at the local Half-Price Books, not looking for anything in particular.  I picked up Marie Brennan’s A Natural History of Dragons (because, well, dragons!) from the New BestsellerA Natural History of Dragons rack.  It isn’t new (the hard cover edition was released last year), just new in trade paperback, and the cover grabbed me, as did a quick look at the back blurb and the preface.  Then I wandered back through the science fiction racks and made two (possibly contradictory) decisions.  I bought a paper copy of Hugh Howey’s Wool, which I already have on my Kindle but would prefer to read on paper (the book is highly recommended by my friend Colleen Thompson), and I rejected an older paperback copy of an alternate history novel because the print was small and cramped and I know I can get it in digital format and increase the type size.

Then I went back to Barnes & Noble to look for a new book by another friend, Sharon Sala.  I have been looking forward The Curl Up and Dyeto reading The Curl Up and Dye, and I have a companion novella, Color Me Bad, waiting on my Kindle.

Of course I have also been feeding my Kindle faster than I read the books that pile up on it, too.  In the last month or so I have downloaded three Daily Deals: Why Shoot a Butler? by Georgette Heyer, Artifact by Gigi Pandian, and Bride of the Rat God by Barbara Hambly.  I try to restrain myself on the Daily Deals, and I think three in the last month is pretty restrained.  I also bought a few by writer friends: Up to the Challenge by Terri Osburn, Archer’s Sin by Amy Raby, and Draw Me In and What’s Yours is Mine by Talia Quinn.

Currently I’m reading three books, in my usual scattered fashion.  Three Princes is proving to be every bit as good as I had hoped.  The Searchers: The Making of an American Legend, by Glenn Frankel, is a fascinating work about the background and making of the famous movie.  I bought this book some time ago, after reading a review in the Houston Chronicle, but just opened it to read this weekend.  I’m having trouble putting it down.

Bride of the Rat GodAnd on my Kindle, I’m halfway through Bride of the Rat God.  I’d read several chapters before I realized that I’d read the book before, back in 1994 when it first came out (I could confirm this thanks to a slightly OCD compulsion to keep all those lists of books I’ve read on my computer–the lists actually predate the first computer by several years, and I must have typed them in after the fact).  Clearly the setting, Hollywood in the 1920s, is just as appealing twenty years later (and wonderfully described), but I’m sorry I no longer have the paperback copy, if only for its delightfully pulpy cover.

Adjusting to Change

Change is seldom easy, even when you’ve been looking forward to it.  Not that I’m complaining about my new schedule, not at all.  This is my second long weekend, and it’s not over yet.  Tomorrow is Monday, and I don’t have to go to work, don’t have to get up at 6:15, don’t have to drive into Houston.

It’s just that I’m having my usual trouble relaxing, reminding myself that my schedule is looser now, that I don’t really have anything pressing I have to do before tomorrow.

I’ve been sleeping seven or eight hours a night,  instead of the five or six I’ve been managing with for so long.  I wonder how long it takes to recover from chronic sleep deprivation, and one friend tells me he’s still trying to catch up with the sleep he lost doing shift work forty years ago.  Another friend, who retired from teaching to write full time a few years back, tells me I’ll soon be just as busy as I ever was.  She may be right, but I’m hoping most of that busyness will be of my own choosing.

I’m still too tired to read much when I get into bed, but this afternoon I sat and read for an hour (Carl Hiaasen’s Bad Monkey)–while doing the laundry, before an hour of ironing.  Some things don’t change.  I haven’t cracked any of the DVD movies I’ve been saving, but I’ve caught up on a few TV shows On Demand.

We’ve gotten some rain this week, and today it was overcast, relatively cool, and extremely humid.  Fortunately I mowed the lawn last Monday, but that’s about all I’ve done in the yard, except for collecting several bags of toad stools before they could spread even more spores across the lawn.  And the rain woke up the mosquitos.

More BooksI’ve done some shopping, of course, some of it necessary (groceries) and some for fun (books).  I’m still buying books, or downloading them to my Kindle, far faster than I’m reading them, but that’s nothing new.  Last weekend I went to Barnes & Noble for several books by friends (Lady in Red by Maire Claremont, Summer Is For Lovers by Jennifer McQuiston, Spy’s Honor by Amy Raby, and Find Me by Romily Bernard), and that lovely anthology of the first five Oz books–with the original illustrations!  This weekend, I went to Half Price Books and picked up the latest novels by two authors I’ve read regularly since their first books came out, Sue Grafton’s W Is For Wasted and Steve Berry’s The King’s Deception.

Yesterday I did get up at 6 AM, to make the long drive across town to the West Houston RWA meeting.  My term as president is almost over–one more meeting, and some planning and paperwork to take care of, and then I can pass that on to the next board.  It’s not an onerous job, but it’s time consuming, and two years is quite enough.  I’m lightening the load.

I’m still a bit in vacation mode.  I haven’t made appointments or plans for any of those easier-done-on-a-weekday projects I’ve been saving.  But I’m working on my latest writing project again, and I have eight pages to read to my critique group tomorrow evening.

And lots of books to read.

Recent Reading

A couple of weeks ago, when the Romance Writers of America RITA® nominations were announced, I was about halfway through reading The Welcome Committee of Butternut Creek, by Jane Myers Perrine, and I was delighted to see it listed as a nominee in the category Novel with Strong Romantic Elements.  I looked for it first in the Inspirational category, because it was published by Faith Words, the Inspirational Divison of the Hachette Group.  But I think the book is right where it belongs.

I had picked Welcome Committee up one night when I wanted something warm and comfortable to read, and it just filled the Welcome Committee of Butternut Creekbill.  It tells the story of a very young, newly-minted minister who arrives in a small town in Texas to take over a church, not knowing what to expect from the congregation or his new life.  Oh, he’s taken classes in church management at the seminary, but that’s not the same as real experience.  And he’s in for some new experiences, particularly at the hands of the Widows, a couple of ladies of the congregation who believe, among other things, that a minister should be married.

The Widows don’t give up on their new minister, but they set meddling in his life aside to concentrate on a damaged war vet and his physical therapist, two characters who have the reader pulling for them from their first appearance.

Jane Perrine, who is an ordained minister herself, never preaches.  She writes about life in a small town church, and about people who try to do the right thing and care about one another.  The next book in the series, The Matchmakers of Butternut Creek, is at the top of my Books To Buy list, and The Wedding Planners of Butternut Creek will be out in the fall.

Earlier this year I read another of Jane Perrine’s books, Miss Prim, a Regency romance written several years ago and published by Avalon, recently resissued on paper and for the Kindle by Amazon.  Miss Prim is the story of Lady Louisa Walker, whose staid and well-regulated spinsterhood is turned completely upside down by an old flame who pulls her into wild adventures involving French spies, a race across the countryside, and a mysterious baby.

I haven’t managed a lot of reading time since the first of the year.  Busy at work and with RWA activities, and far less writing than I’d like to claim.  I’ve read three good mysteries, Janet Evanovich’s Notorious Nineteen (who really cares about the mystery when the characters are so much fun?), Marcia Muller’s Looking for Yesterday (I’ve been following Sharon McCone’s cases–and life–since she first appeared in Edwin of the Iron Shoes in 1977), and Margaret Maron’s The Buzzard Table (Judge Deborah Knott is another series character I have followed from the beginning).

Currently I’m enjoying Colleen Thompson’s Passion to Protect, an edge-of-the-seat romantic suspense novel.  The Steampunk book is on my coffee table, with a book mark very near the beginning.  The book on The Searchers is there, too, without one.  On my Kindle I’m following a serial, Falling for Frederick by Cheryl Bolen.

Yesterday I stopped at the local Barnes & Noble to look for a copy of my Starcatcher sister Amy Raby’s first release, Assassin’s Gambit.  I found it on the New In Paperback kiosk in the middle of the store and stopped to take a picture of the book “in the wild” to send to Amy.  There I was, on one knee with my camera, when I realized a man was watching me.  “My friend’s first book,” I explained.  “Wouldn’t it be more help to buy it and read it?” he asked.  “I will,” I promised, “but I also want to send her a picture.”  Apparently satisfied, he nodded and walked away.  Without reporting me to store security.