More Cozy Series

I started to call this “Two New Cozies,” but actually only one, from Zara Keane, is a new series. The other, by Alice Duncan, I discovered thanks to (I think) Bookbub (I get far too many ebook sales emails every morning!). Just for fun, I’ve added the second book in Nancy Cole Silverman’s series about a Hollywood radio reporter.

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I have enjoyed all of Zara Keane’s Movie Club Mystery stories, and she starts a new Irish-set cozy mystery series with Deadline With Death, throwing in a touch of the paranormal with a bit of time travel. Dee Flanagan performs a daily balancing act, juggling her ill-paying job as a reporter for the Dunleagh Chronicle, her non-paying work on her history blog, and her irrepressible grandmother. When she finds herself caught in the middle of some very odd happenings at Dunleagh Castle, her knowledge of Irish history makes her wonder about the man, dressed in a century-old Royal Irish Constabulary uniform, who falls at her feet, wounded by gunfire. Is he a stray from some sort of historical reenactment? Why didn’t anyone else hear the gunfire, and who shot the clown? Dee tries hard to separate herself from her family’s reputation for eccentricity (all that woo-woo stuff), but with both her grandmother and her mother drawn into the mayhem surrounding the castle, Dee doesn’t know what to think.

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As in her Movie Club Mystery series, Keane fills her tale with the inhabitants and circumstances of life in a small Irish town. Her Time-Slip Mystery series promises to be just as full of humor, eccentric characters, and, of course, mystery. Thoroughly entertaining.

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Lost Among the Angels is the first in Alice Duncan’s Mercy Allcutt cozy mystery series, new to me but published several years ago. I picked it up because it’s set in Los Angeles in 1926, a setting and time period that I always find entertaining. Mercy, the naive but enthusiastic narrator, has moved from her sheltered (and wealthy) life in Boston to live with her sister (married to a movie executive), experience Real Life, get a job, and someday write a novel. She manages to land a position as secretary to a private investigator named Ernie Templeton (her big adventures back in Boston involved taking typing and shorthand classes, a secret from her family).

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Secretary, heck, Mercy wants to be an apprentice P.I., and she throws herself into helping her boss with his cases. And help she does, although sometimes it’s more by accident than intent.

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Lost Among the Angels gets off to a bit of a slow start, with Mercy trying to figure out Los Angeles, perhaps a bit too silly and naive, but she grew on me, the cases piled up, and Ernie turned out to be a peach of an employer (and perhaps something more in the following volumes?), alternately amused and aggravated by Mercy’s impulsive behavior, and Mercy’s East Coast elite upbringing actually stands her in good stead from time to time. A fun book, and I’ve downloaded the next one, Angels Flight.

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And here’s the second book in a series I’ve been enjoying, also spotted on a sale. In Nancy Cole Silverman’s Beyond a Doubt, Los Angeles radio reporter Carol Childs investigates a body dropped from a helicopter, meets a Marilyn Monroe impersonator named Holly Wood, and sees someone who just might be the ghost of Clark Gable. Her investigations lead to a string of missing girls, some prominently reported and some barely noticed, and then to the possibility of a human trafficking ring. With her prime suspect seemingly untouchable, and her station management shying away from hard news, Carol may be on her own, but she’s determined to get the story—and find the missing girls. This is another series from the Henery Press cozy stable.