Flash Drives!

Recently the topic of backing up computer files came up at my local RWA chapter meeting. The next day I had a minor back up problem of my own. Either the monthly Windows update or the middle-of-the-night reboot that accompanied it scrambled my open Quicken file beyond repair. The most recent back up I had of the file was almost three weeks old, and it took a lot of paper (check book, bills paid, debit card receipts, etc.) to reconstruct the missing time (I’m a little OCD about financial records). Not a disaster, took me an hour or so to fix, but it did get me thinking about backing up files.

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I have an external hard drive to which my computer backs up frequently, but I’ve never bothered to learn how to retrieve specific files from it. It just sits there on my desk. I’ve always backed up (with varying degrees of frequency) to flash drives (or, back in the day, diskettes, and I’ll bet I have a box of those in the attic, with no computer in the house that will read them).

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I had been using a pair of 16GB drives, but I’ve been warned they don’t last forever, and they were starting to feel small (!), so I stopped by Office Depot and picked up a pair of 32GB drives (between the sale price and my OD rewards, the two drives cost me 16 bucks and change, sales tax included).

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flash drivesAnd I discovered a cache of seventeen flash drives in a small drawer on my desk, with no idea what’s on most of them, how old they are, how much they hold, or why I’ve kept them. So I decided to take a trip down (computer) memory lane.

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Four small round drives, 16MB each. The blue one is empty. The red one has a tiny file called “autorun.” One yellow one has a few files from 2007 and photos from the surprise birthday party my friends gave me that year. The other yellow one has an early version of a novel (all 640KB of it). Ten years ago those 16MB drives were quite roomy.

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A 128MB drive last used in 2010 has copies of four novels and a financial program Microsoft discontinued, and 45MB of empty space. Took me a minute to figure out how to open that one.

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Another 128MB drive from 2007 (a Corsair Flash Voyager) contains a few random files, a couple of fonts, and a collection of pictures by the artist Kliban.

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A 512MB drive shaped like a bullet has one back up each from my home and work computers, dated 2007. A 512MB Lexar drive holds the 2011 version of my novel that made the Golden Heart finals that year and a collection of landscape photos.

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A red Lexar drive holding about 1GB contains back ups from my work computer dated 2010. A matching blue drive, labeled “downloads,” holds a list of random files and a collection of wildlife photos from 2008 and 2009. Another 1GB Lexar holds birthday party pictures, software I don’t even recognize, and a few random files.

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Moving up to 2GB drives, I have two that I probably bought because they have pretty floral cases. One has a copy of a novel and a back up from December 2012. The other one contains the set up file for a Sudoku program that has long since disappeared from commercial availability and the chapter affiliation files for 2011 for West Houston RWA (I was president of the chapter that year). A 4GB drive in a floral case has back ups from 2014.

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Then came a pair of Lexar 8GB drives, both holding back ups from 2015, and another pair of Lexars, 16GB each, that I started using in 2016.

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Clearly, I could throw most of these drives out right now, and never miss them. But I don’t think I will. It’s fun to poke through them and see what I’ve saved over the years. I’m impressed by the fact that, despite dire warnings of shelf life, every one of these drives opened without a problem (at least digitally—a few of them were a bit puzzling to open physically). I am not impressed by my rather spotty back up practices.

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I resolve to do better with my new 32GB flash drives, rather like carrying an umbrella on an overcast day. If you have it, chances are you won’t need it, but if you need it you’ll be glad you have it.

 

4 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Leslie
    Feb 24, 2018 @ 11:50:59

    I back up daily to a passport drive. But I’ve got to start checking into cloud-based backups. To back up my backup.

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  2. gerrybartlett
    Feb 25, 2018 @ 09:10:02

    I find old flash drives in my purses. Book paranoia used to have me downloading works in progress on one when I traveled and I’d carry it with me in case the house burned down or blew away while I was out of town. Then I’d promptly forget about it. Now everything is backed up automatically to a cloud system called SugarSync and a hard drive. If I check it, I’m sure it’s current. Our mutual pal Nina emails her wip to herself every night. More paranoia. I still save a partial to a flash drive if I’m leaving for a few days. It’s comforting. Hard to trust technology. But them I’m a dinosaur.

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    • Kay Hudson
      Feb 25, 2018 @ 09:14:41

      I found — and printed out — the documentation for my external hard drive yesterday, so maybe if something gets scrambled again I’ll be able to restore it from there. But I still feel better having back ups completely separate from the computer system. Haven’t tried a cloud back up yet.

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