Books: Mystery With Humor

Corrie Locke, the heroine of Lida Sideris’ Murder and Other Unnatural Disasters, is a newly minted lawyer who has just landed her dream job as a contract attorney for a motion picture production company. Murder and Other Unnatural DisastersUnfortunately for Corrie (but not for the reader), Keith-Ameripictures appears to be staffed entirely by lunatics. And while all Corrie wants is to live a fairly normal life and hang on to her new job, her reputation, or rather her father’s, haunts her.

Corrie spent her teen years helping her private investigator dad solve cases, even cracking a few herself. And word has gotten around. One of the security people at her new job quickly pulls her into the mystery of a recent suicide that might have a more sinister explanation, a pro basketball player insists she hunt for his missing lucky (and extremely bad-tempered) cat, and a barely coherent rap star brings her a case of alien abduction.

Murder and Other Unnatural Disasters is a wild roller coaster ride, full of loony characters, snappy dialog, and at least one ruthless murderer. Fans of Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum series will certainly enjoy the ride, and will spot a few common notes: Corrie’s self-appointed sidekick, Veera, reminds me of a better educated, better behaved, and definitely better dressed Lula, and Corrie finds her attention split between two attractive men: her long-time best friend Michael Parris and snarky, quick-thinking ADA James Zachary.

There are a lot of characters to keep track of, and abrupt transitions sometimes had me wondering where the characters were and how they got there. But the dialog is snappy and funny, and Corrie is an entertaining and sympathetic heroine as she navigates the perils of her new job, the temptations of investigating crime and craziness, and the dangers of raiding her mother’s padlocked and nanny-cammed closet for wardrobe emergencies. I hope this is the beginning of a new series and that Corrie, Veera, Michael, and James will be back. Put up your shingle, Corrie, and make your own dream job.

Speaking of Janet Evanovich, Tricky Twenty-Two is the latest in the long-running adventures of Stephanie Plum, the world’s most accident-prone bond enforcement agent. I can’t say worst, because Tricky Twenty-TwoStephanie usually gets her man (or occasional woman) in the long run, but along the way she destroys cars, gets beat up, goes to pre-funeral viewings with her gun-toting grandma, and wavers between two men, cop Joe Morelli and security ace Ranger Manoso.

I see a lot of snarky reviews from people who swear they’ll never read another book in this series, they’re terrible, they’re repetitious, etc. So, okay, don’t. (Like the people who want the TV shows they hate canceled, instead of just turning to another channel. Better yet, turn off the TV, folks.) Meanwhile, this installment hit Number One on the New York Times Bestseller list.

Yes, in Tricky Twenty-Two a few cars are destroyed (one of them by geese–now that’s different). Yes, Grandma takes her gun to a viewing or two, Lula eats her way through the book, Stephanie and Joe get crosswise, Stephanie moonlights for Ranger. Yes, if I were Stephanie I would have married Joe a long time ago.

These are comfort books. I know what’s coming–that’s why I buy them year after year. That’s why I enjoy them. I love the characters. I love the crazy messes Stephanie gets into. I’ll keep reading them as long as Evanovich keeps writing them. I’ve gotten bored with other mystery series and characters, but I still love Stephanie.

Talk to me!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: